Gilgit-Baltistan

APR 12

Preliminary   > Geography   >   Places in news   >   Places in news

Why in news?

  • Pakistan-occupied Gilgit Baltistan Governor Raja Jalal Hussain Maqpoon has decided to resign from his office, reported local media citing sources.

About Gilgit-Baltistan:

  • Gilgit-Baltistan, formerly known as the Northern Areas, is a region located in Pak occupied Kashmir (PoK).
  • It is administered by Pakistan as an administrative territory, and constituting the northern portion of the larger Kashmir region.
  • It is part of Ladakh union territory of India and is separated from the Jammu Kashmir and Ladakh Union Territories by the Line of Control, the de facto border between India and Pakistan.
  • It is a strategically important region for Pakistan as the China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) passes through the region.

Geography:

  • Gilgit-Baltistan is home to five of the "eight-thousanders" or mountain peaks above 8000 m height including K2 (Mount Godwin-Austen) and Nanga Parbat.
  • Three of the world's longest glaciers outside the Polar Regions are found in Gilgit-Baltistan:
    • Biafo Glacier
    • Baltoro Glacier
    • Batura Glacier.
  • It is an ancient Buddhist centre and many Buddhist archaeological remains are found in the region.

History:

  • The area was occupied by Pakistani forces during the 1948 war with Pakistan and has remained in control since then.
  • Although under effective control of Pakistan, it has not been made a province of Pakistan and is considered autonomous in theory.
  • Pakistani government has till now rejected Gilgit-Baltistani calls for integration with Pakistan on the grounds that it would jeopardise its demands for the whole Kashmir issue to be resolved according to UN resolutions.

PRACTICE QUESTION:

Consider the following statements regarding “Gilgit Baltistan”:

1. It has many ancient Buddhist archaeological remains.

2. Baltoro Glacier is located in this region.

Which of the statements given above is/are correct?

(a)1 only

(b) 2 only

(c) Both 1 and 2

(d) Neither 1 nor 2

Answer